Jacques Rancière

Professor of Philosophy at The European Graduate School / EGS.

Jacques Rancière

Biography

Jacques Rancière (b. 1940) is a professor of philosophy at The European Graduate School / EGS, professor emeritus at the Université de Paris, VIII, and one of the more significant and influential philosophers of our time. Over the last fifteen years, his work has slowly been translated into English, and yet, while some of his writings remain untranslated into this global language, he has nonetheless already cast a long shadow over the fields of politics, aesthetics, and education, well beyond the borders of France, in particular, and across the Anglo-American world. It is somewhat difficult to categorize much of Rancière’s work, especially his archival texts, but the overarching focus has certainly always been politics. Within this classification, it is, however, possible to more delicately divide his work into three “primary” categories as mentioned above: aesthetics, education, and politics. Yet the overarching political project of Rancière does not, however, only consist of these three categories independently but is constituted by their entanglement; as for Rancière, aesthetics and politics are intrinsically linked, and “true” education must be emancipatory, an objective that demands equality not as an end but as a point of departure. As a result, politics is not only a string of his project, but what knots its three elements—in brief, politics overdetermines the whole.

Rancière was educated at the École Normale Supérieure, where he was a student of Louis Althusser. With his professor, and other students of Althusser, namely Étienne Balibar, Roger Establet, and Pierre Macherey, he composed and published the seminal Lire le capital, in 1965. Over the next few years, like many of Althusser’s students, Rancière was an active member of the Union des Étudiants Communistes, and constituted the famous cercle d’Ulm, out of which came the now canonical Cahiers Marxistes-Léninistes and Cahiers pour l’Analyse. By 1974, however, Rancière formally broke away from his professor, a theoretical break that culminated in the publication: Althusser’s Lesson. In the same year, Rancière co-founded the journal Révoltes logiques.

Since the publication of Althusser’s Lesson, Rancière has published numerous books, including: The Nights of Labour: The Workers’ Dream in Nineteenth-Century France, The Ignorant Schoolmaster: Five Lessons in Intellectual Emancipation, The Names of History: On the Poetics of Knowledge, On the Shores of Politics, Disagreement: Politics and Philosophy, Short Voyages to the Land of the People, The Politics of Aesthetics: The Distribution of the Sensible, The Philosopher and his Poor, The Future of the Image, Hatred of Democracy, The Aesthetic Unconscious, The Emancipated Spectator, The Politics of Literature, Staging the People: The Proletarian and His Double, Mute Speech: Literature, Critical Theory, and Politics, Aisthesis: Scenes from the Aesthetic Regime of Art, and Béla Tarr, the Time After.

The work of Jacques Rancière, no less than most philosophers, psychoanalysts, sociologists, anthropologists, political theorists, or linguists of the time, cannot be understood, either theoretically or politically, without taking into account the context of struggle in France in the second half of the twentieth century [1]. In the early decades of the last century, one could argue that two opposing currents dominated French philosophy: a “philosophy of life,” led by Henri Bergson, and a “philosophy of the concept,” led by Léon Brunschvicg. In addition, French philosophy in these early decades of the twentieth century was largely preoccupied with the philosophy of science, by way of Jean Cavaille, Georges Canguilhem, and Gaston Bachelard, and by its appropriation of German philosophy, from Immanuel Kant to Martin Heidegger. In fact, the problem in the appropriation of German philosophy remains a fundamental point of contention in French philosophy today. Between the great wars, and in the aftermath of the second, French philosophy took a further twist, with existentialism and phenomenology coming to prominence, through the work of Jean-Paul Sartre and Maurice Merleau-Ponty, among others. By the sixties, via of developments in structuralist anthropology and linguistics, existentialism, with its focus on the subject, and phenomenology, with its supposition of a transparent subject, were “replaced” by structuralism and psychoanalysis. The two would dominate French theory throughout the 1960s and 1970s, only to be replaced, or subsumed by post-structuralism, and those who became known as the “new philosophers.” Today, one could argue that contemporary French philosophy is divided between the remnants of post-structuralism, the “new philosophers,” and a philosophical movement, which is, as yet, without a name, but involves not only a return to Marx and Freud, but also a return to traditional philosophical concepts, such as truth, ontology, and the subject, as well as a fusion of subject and structure. To further complicate matters, it is impossible to consider French philosophy, or French theory, more generally, outside the political history of twentieth century France, from the First World War to the Second, from the Resistance to May 1968, and from the election of Mitterrand to the onset of neo-liberalism. Rancière’s work, like that of any other philosopher of the latter half of the last century, cannot be approached if abstracted from this historical context.

While impossible to outline Jacques Rancière’s oeuvre in brief, given the knotting of aesthetics, politics, and education that constitute his project, it is possible to elucidate the whole by investigating a part. In this vein, Rancière’s The Ignorant Schoolmaster: Five Lessons in Intellectual Emancipation, condenses many of his fundamental axioms, and as well clarifies the philosopher’s position within the context of struggle outlined above, in particular the conditions and consequences of May 1968.

Published in France in 1987, The Ignorant Schoolmaster was in part a direct response to one of the central issues constitutive of the events of May 1968. Already, there was criticism of the educational institutions preceding May 1968: earlier in the 1960s student protests had already begun to question the arbitrariness of examinations and research, as well as the ideological, political, and social status of the university, and schools more generally, and eventually led to the formation of La Sorbonne aux etudiants (Kristin Ross, “Translator’s Introduction”, in The Ignorant Schoolmaster, xvi). In 1964, Pierre Bourdieu and Jean-Claude Passeron published Les Héritiers: Les étudiants et la culture, wherein they pronounced the university to be an institution “entirely absorbed in the reproduction of unequal social structures” (ibid., x). This publication sent shockwaves through the institutions, and eventually led to two theoretical sequels, La Reproduction: Éléments d’une théorie du système d’enseignement, in 1970, and La Distinction: Critique sociale du jugement (by Pierre Bourdieu) in 1979. This sociological criticism prompted a response from Althusser himself; almost immediately after Les Heritiers, Althusser, in Problèmes étudiants (1964), responded that the function of teaching is to transmit a determinate knowledge to subjects who lack it, and so the entirety of the situation ultimately rests on the “absolute condition of an inequality between a knowledge and a nonknowledge” (Problèmes étudiants, 152, quoted in Ross, xvi). This asymmetry was quickly affirmed by the influential Lacanian linguist, Jean-Claude Milner, who, in 1984, would give the summation of his thoughts on education in De l’école (Ross, xiv). Amongst this theoretical upheaval, Rancière struck a different chord, following neither Bourdieu, Milner, nor his teacher; and it was, in fact, during this period that Rancière began to formulate his break from Althusser, which culminated in the publication of the above mentioned Althusser’s Lesson, in 1974.

According to Rancière, Bourdieu had produced a discourse which denounced the system, but in a manner that failed to intervene in its perpetuation. In the Introduction to L’Empire du sociologue, published in 1984, Rancière and the other members of the Révoltes logiques, would criticize not only the duplicity of Bourdieu’s position, but also revealed it to be a tautology, which they termed the “Bourdieu effect”; Bourdieu at once maintained that working class youth are excluded from the university because they are blind to the reasons of their exclusion, and that this ignorance of the cause of their exclusion is a product of the system that excludes them—”they are excluded because they don’t know why they are excluded, and they don’t know why they are excluded because they are excluded” (Rossxi).

In Rancière’s view, the entirety of Bourdieu’s critical reform project was invalidated by way of this tautology; moreover, Bourdieu’s position was inadequate because while it denounced the mechanisms of domination, it simultaneously posited only an illusion of liberation (ibid., xi). Milner, on the other hand, modeling his argument on the psychoanalytic clinic, argued for the necessity of maintaining an asymmetrical relationship between student and teacher, proposing that the inequality produced a desire to know. He called for a return to rigorous instruction, and proclaimed that true equality would be attained only if the same knowledge was transmitted to each student (ibid., xiv). Similarly, Althusser’s position, which was consistent with his fundamental distinction between science and ideology, maintained not only that the asymmetry must be absolutely assumed, but claimed that the primary objective of education was for the students to develop a thorough knowledge of Marxism-Leninism, and then conduct scientific analyses yielding objective knowledge, because equality was not a matter of the form of pedagogical relation, but of the quality of the knowledge transmitted and attained. In brief, his position was that the political implications of education were not based on inequitable relations between students and teachers, but only in the content of what was taught (ibid., xvii). Rancière certainly agreed that contesting the content of what was taught was essential, but that positing the content as the scene of contention missed the heart of the problem.

In Althusser’s Lesson, and most specifically in, “A Lesson in History: The Damages of Humanism,” Rancière argued that Althusser’s concept of science––and the distinction between science and ideology––had no other function than to secure the asymmetrical relation between those who possess knowledge and those who do not, and secure it in such a way that it could never be crossed. In short, he argued that this distinction was homologous to the distinction between those who own the means of production and those dispossessed, hence why in countries like China and the USSR, the relationship of domination returned, despite the political and economic upheaval that had taken place. Throughout his works on pedagogy, Rancière has placed the entire idea of “philosophy as a judge” in question, for the simple reason that it is constituted on the division of mental and manual labor, and therefore, its testimony cannot so easily assume the authority it has traditionally been granted (Ross, xviii). From this problematic, which supposes a specific conceptualization of both philosophy and politics, Rancière eventually arrives at the conclusion that between philosophy and politics there is a fundamental disagreement (Disagreement: Politics and Philosophy). Rancière’s break from Althusser spawned a decade-long study of archives chronicling the experiences, thoughts, and voices of early nineteenth-century workers. Within these archives Rancière found those who had begun to emancipate themselves by the apparently simple act of claiming for themselves what previously belonged only to the upper classes, namely, they assumed the right to think, that they too could come to know, that they had an equality of intelligence. Put another way, these workers assumed an existence outside of their material condition.

According to Rancière, debates amongst the various theoretical positions on education, equality, ideology, and state apparatuses miss the point entirely unless they begin from the premise and practice of an equality of intelligence. This pivotal point is at the center of all of Rancière’s work. T/his “investigation of the origin, continuation, and occasional subversion of the hiercharchical division of head and hand has been launched on two fronts. The first might be called the archival level, the documenting, chronicling, essentially recounting, of the experiences and voices of early-nineteenth century workers”; and this “narrative work has run parallel to … the second, more polemical and discursive front: Rancière’s critique of the claims of bourgeois observers and intellectuals … to know, and thus ‘speak for’ or explicate, the privileged other of political modernity, the worker” (Ross, xviii/f). In brief, his thesis is that equality must be assumed as a point of departure and not a destination, for the simple reason that explication is “the myth of pedagogy,” since it does not eliminate incapacity and inequality, but in fact creates it and assures its continuation (ibid., xix/f). This “pedagogical myth,” according to Rancière, divides the world in those who know and those who do not, or those who can explain and those who will always need explication, since explication functions on the logical structure of infinite delay. The Ignorant Schoolmaster, wherein the story of Joseph Jacotot is told, forces one to confront the founding principles of political modernity––equality and emancipation. This line of thought has been further developed in Philosopher and his Poor, Nights of Labour, Staging the People, and a number of other published works. The essential axiom of “equality as a starting point,” and the structural considerations that follow, are not relegated to his meditations on pedagogy, but form the very kernel of his thought on aesthetics (such as, The Emancipated Spectator) and politics, which according to the philosopher have only one true practice, a community of equals.

[1] For the following, see also Alain Badiou, “The Adventure of French Philosophy,” published in New Left Review 35, September-October 2005, available at http://www.lacan.com/badenglish.htm

—Srdjan Cvjeticanin

Works

Books

Moments Politiques, Rancière, Jacques. Moments Politiques. Seven Stories Press, 2014. ISBN: 160980533X

Figures of History, Rancière, Jacques. Figures of History. Polity, 2014. ISBN: 0745679560

Béla Tarr: The Time After, Rancière, Jacques. Béla Tarr: The Time After. Univocal, 2013. ISBN: 1937561151

Aisthesis: Scenes from the Aesthetic Regime of Art, Rancière, Jacques. Aisthesis: Scenes from the Aesthetic Regime of Art. Verso, 2013. ISBN: 1781680892

The Intellectual and His People: Staging the People Volume 2, Rancière, Jacques. The Intellectual and His People: Staging the People Volume 2. Verso, 2012. ISBN: 1844678601

Figures de l’histoire, Rancière, Jacques. Figures de l’histoire. PUF, 2012. ISBN: 2130595111

Mute Speech, Rancière, Jacques. Mute Speech. Translated by James Swenson. Columbia University Press, 2011. ISBN: 0231151020

Althusser’s Lesson, Rancière, Jacques. Althusser’s Lesson. Bloomsbery, 2011. ISBN: 144110805X

Mallarme: The Politics of the Siren, Rancière, Jacques. Mallarme: The Politics of the Siren. Translated by Steven Corcoran. Bloomsbury, 2011. ISBN: 0826438407

Staging the People: The Proletarian and His Double, Rancière, Jacques. Staging the People: The Proletarian and His Double. Translated by David Fernbach. Verso, 2011. ISBN: 1844676978

Politics of Literature, Rancière, Jacques. Politics of Literature. Translated by Julie Rose. Polity Press, 2011. ISBN: 0745645313

Dissensus: On Politics and Aesthetics, Rancière, Jacques. Dissensus: On Politics and Aesthetics. Translated by Steven Corcoran. Continuum, 2010. ISBN: 1847064450

Chronicles of Consensual Times, Rancière, Jacques. Chronicles of Consensual Times. Translated by Steven Corcoran. Continuum, 2010. ISBN: 0826442889

The Future of the Image, Rancière, Jacques. The Future of the Image. Navayana, 2010. ISBN: 3642065473

Le philosophe et ses pauvres, Rancière, Jacques. Le philosophe et ses pauvres. Flammarion, 2010. ISBN: 2081235374

The Aesthetic Unconscious, Rancière, Jacques. The Aesthetic Unconscious. Polity, 2010. ISBN: 0745646433

Der Philosoph und Seine Armen, Rancière, Jacques. Der Philosoph und Seine Armen. Translated by Richard Steurer. Edited by Peter Engelmann. Passagen, 2010. ISBN: 3851659317

Das Fleisch der Worte Politik(en) der Schrift, Rancière, Jacques. Das Fleisch der Worte Politik(en) der Schrift. Translated by Marc Blankenburg and Christina Hünsche. Diaphanes, 2010. ISBN: 3037340843

Et Tant Pis Pour les Gens Fatigués: Entretiens, Rancière, Jacques. Et Tant Pis Pour les Gens Fatigués: Entretiens. Amsterdam, 2009. ISBN: 2354800568

Moments Politiques: Interventions 1977-2009, Rancière, Jacques. Moments Politiques: Interventions 1977-2009. Fabrique, 2009. ISBN: 2358720011

The Emancipated Spectator, Rancière, Jacques. The Emancipated Spectator. Translated by Gregory Elliott. Verso, 2009. ISBN: 184467343X

Der emanzipierte Zuschauer, Rancière, Jacques. Der emanzipierte Zuschauer. Translated by Richard Steurer. Passagen, 2009. ISBN: 3851659082

Aesthetics and its Discontents, Rancière, Jacques. Aesthetics and its Discontents. Polity Press, 2009. ISBN: 0745646301

Ist Kunst Widerständig?, Rancière, Jacques. Ist Kunst Widerständig? Translated by Jan Völker. Merve, 2008. ISBN: 3883962449

Le Spectateur Emancipé, Rancière, Jacques. Le Spectateur Emancipé. Fabrique, 2008. ISBN: 2913372805

Zehn Thesen zur Politik, Rancière, Jacques. Zehn Thesen zur Politik. Translated by Marc Blankenburg. Diaphanes, 2008. ISBN: 3037340312

Na Brzegach Politycznego, Rancière, Jacques. Na Brzegach Politycznego. Translated by Sowa. Korporacja, 2008. ISBN: 9788389911476

Nienawisc do Demokracji, Rancière, Jacques. Nienawisc do Demokracji. Translated by Maciej Kropiwnicki and Instyt Wydawnicz. Ksiazka I Prasa, 2008. ISBN: 8388353373

Politik der Literatur, Rancière, Jacques. Politik der Literatur. Translated by Peter Engelmann. Passagen, 2008. ISBN: 3851658647

Der Unwissende Lehrmeister: Fünf Lektionen über die Intellektuelle Emanzipation,Rancière, Jacques. Der Unwissende Lehrmeister: Fünf Lektionen über die Intellektuelle Emanzipation. Translated by Peter Engelmann. Passagen, 2007. ISBN: 3851657950

Politique de la Littérature, Rancière, Jacques. Politique de la Littérature. Galilée, 2007. ISBN: 2718607351

En los Bordes de lo Político, Rancière, Jacques. En los Bordes de lo Político. Translated by Alejandro Madrid. La Cebra, 2007. ISBN: 9872288429

Das Unbehagen in der Ästhetik, Rancière, Jacques. Das Unbehagen in der Ästhetik. Translated by Peter Engelmann. Passagen, 2007. ISBN: 3851658191

Hatred of Democracy, Rancière, Jacques. Hatred of Democracy. Translated by Steven Corcoran. Verso, 2007. ISBN: 1844670988

The Future of the Image, Rancière, Jacques. The Future of the Image. Verso, 2007. ISBN: 1844671070

Hatet mot Demokratin, Rancière, Jacques. Hatet mot Demokratin. Translated by Kim West. Tankekraft, 2007. ISBN: 9197671797

政治的边缘 / Zheng zhi de bian yuan, Rancière, Jacques. 政治的边缘 / Zheng zhi de bian yuan. Translated by Yake Langxi’ai zhu and Jiang Yuhui yi. Yi wen chu ban she, 2007. ISBN: 7532742679

Il Destino delle Immagini, Rancière, Jacques. Il Destino delle Immagini. Translated by Roberto De Gaetano. Pellegrini Editore, 2007. ISBN: 8881014513

On the Shores of Politics, Rancière, Jacques. On the Shores of Politics. Translated by Liz Heron. Verso, 2007. ISBN: 1844675777

Das Asthetische Unbewußte, Rancière, Jacques. Das Asthetische Unbewußte. Translated by Ronald Voullié. Diaphanes, 2006. ISBN: 3935300891

Die Aufteilung des Sinnlichen: die Politik der Kunst und ihre Paradoxien, Rancière, Jacques. Die Aufteilung des Sinnlichen: die Politik der Kunst und ihre Paradoxien. Translated by Maria Muhle. b-books, 2006. ISBN: 3933557674

Aistittavan Osa: Esteettinen ja Poliittinen, Rancière, Jacques. Aistittavan Osa: Esteettinen ja Poliittinen. Translated by Janne Kurki. Apeiron, 2006. ISBN: 9525538125

The Politics of Aesthetics: The Distribution of the Sensible, Rancière, Jacques. The Politics of Aesthetics: The Distribution of the Sensible. Translated by Gabriel Rockhill. Continuum, 2006. ISBN: 0826489540

El Odio a la Democracia, Rancière, Jacques. El Odio a la Democracia. Amorrortu Editores, 2006. ISBN: 846109011X

El Inconsciente Estetico, Rancière, Jacques. El Inconsciente Estetico. Del Estante, 2006. ISBN: 9872195404

La Favola Cinematografica, Rancière, Jacques. La Favola Cinematografica. Edizioni ETS, 2006. ISBN: 8846716698

Film Fables, Rancière, Jacques. Film Fables. Translated by Emiliano Battista. Berg, 2006. ISBN: 184520168X

Els Noms de la Història: una Poètica del Saber, Rancière, Jacques. Els Noms de la Història: una Poètica del Saber. Translated by Ferran Garcia-Oliver. Universitat de Valencia, 2005. ISBN: 843706158X

Nevedni Učitelj: Pet Lekcij o Intelektualni Emancipaciji, Rancière, Jacques. Nevedni Učitelj: Pet Lekcij o Intelektualni Emancipaciji. Zavod En-knap, 2005. ISBN: 9619151119

La Haine de la Démocratie, Rancière, Jacques. La Haine de la Démocratie. Fabrique, 2005. ISBN: 2913372481

Chroniques des Temps Consensuels, Rancière, Jacques. Chroniques des Temps Consensuels. Seuil, 2005. ISBN: 2020820730

Nerazumevanje: Politika in Filozofija, Rancière, Jacques. Nerazumevanje: Politika in filozofija. Translated by Jelica Šumič-Riha. ZRC SAZU, 2005. ISBN: 9616500961

L’Espace des Mots: de Mallarmé à Broodthaers, Rancière, Jacques. L’Espace des Mots: de Mallarmé à Broodthaers. Musée des Beaux-Arts, 2005. ISBN: 2906211427

Politik der Bilder, Rancière, Jacques. Politik der Bilder. Translated by Maria Muhle. Diaphanes, 2005. ISBN: 3935300654

La Fabula Cinematografica, Rancière, Jacques. La Fabula Cinematografica. Ediciones Paidos Iberica, 2005. ISBN: 8449316804

The Flesh of Words: The Politics of Writing, Rancière, Jacques. The Flesh of Words: The Politics of Writing. Translated by Charlotte Mandell. Stanford University Press, 2004. ISBN: 080474078X

The Philosopher and His Poor, Rancière, Jacques. The Philosopher and His Poor. Translated by Andrew Parker. Duke University Press, 2004. ISBN: 0822332744

Anri Sala: Entre Chien et Loup, Rancière, Jacques. Anri Sala: Entre Chien et Loup. ARC, 2004. ISBN: 388375806X

Malaise dans l’Esthétique, Rancière, Jacques. Malaise dans l’Esthétique. Galilée, 2004. ISBN: 2718606622

Le Destin des Images, Rancière, Jacques. Le Destin des Images. Fabrique Editions, 2003. ISBN: 2913372279

Short Voyages to the Land of the People, Rancière, Jacques. Short Voyages to the Land of the People. Translated by James Swenson. Stanford University Press, 2003. ISBN: 0804736812

Les Scènes du Peuple: Les Révoltes Logiques, 1975-1985, Rancière, Jacques. Les Scènes du Peuple: Les Révoltes Logiques, 1975-1985. Horlieu, 2003. ISBN: 2915048029

La División de lo Sensible: Estética y Política, Rancière, Jacques. La División de lo Sensible: Estética y Política. Translated by Antonio Fernández Lera. Consorcio Salamanca, 2002. ISBN: 8495719142

O Mestre Ignorante: Cinco Lições Sobre a Emancipação Intelectual, Rancière, Jacques. O Mestre Ignorante: Cinco Lições Sobre a Emancipação Intelectual. Translated by Miranda Wander Melo. Autentica, 2002. ISBN: 8575260456

Das Unvernehmen: Politik und Philosophie, Rancière, Jacques. Das Unvernehmen: Politik und Philosophie. Translated by Richard Steurer. Suhrkamp, 2002. ISBN: 3518291882

La Fable Cinématographique, Rancière, Jacques. La Fable Cinématographique. Seuil, 2001. ISBN: 2020510537

L’Inconscient Esthétique, Rancière, Jacques. L’Inconscient Esthétique. Galilée, 2001. ISBN: 2718605545

Mallarme, o La politica della Sirena, Rancière, Jacques. Mallarme, o La politica della Sirena. Translated by Alessandro Serra. CLUEB, 2000. ISBN: 8849111665

Le Partage du Sensible: Esthétique et Politique, Rancière, Jacques. Le Partage du Sensible: Esthétique et Politique. Diffusion Les Belles Lettres, 2000. ISBN: 2913372058

Disagreement: Politics and Philosophy, Rancière, Jacques. Disagreement: Politics and Philosophy. Translated by Julie Rose. University of Minnesota Press, 1999. ISBN: 0816628440

La Parole Muette: Essai sur les Contradictions de la Littérature, Rancière, Jacques. La Parole Muette: Essai sur les Contradictions de la Littérature. Hachette littératures, 1998. ISBN: 2012353878

La Chair des Mots: Politiques de l’Ecriture, Rancière, Jacques. La Chair des Mots: Politiques de l’Ecriture. Galilée, 1998. ISBN: 2718604999

Mallarmé, Rancière, Jacques. Mallarmé. Hachette, 1996. ISBN: 2012351972

El Desacuerdo: Política y Filosofía, Rancière, Jacques. El Desacuerdo: Política y Filosofía. Translated by Antonio Camarero. Nueva Vision, 1996. ISBN: 9506023476

La Mésentente: Politique et Philosophie, Rancière, Jacques. La Mésentente: Politique et Philosophie. Galilée, 1995. ISBN: 2718604506

The Names of History: on the Poetics of Knowledge, Rancière, Jacques. The Names of History: on the Poetics of Knowledge. Translated by Hassan Melehy. University of Minnesota Press, 1994. ISBN: 0816624011

Die Namen der Geschichte: Versuch einer Poetik des Wissens, Rancière, Jacques. Die Namen der Geschichte: Versuch einer Poetik des Wissens. Translated by Eva Moldenhauer. Fischer, 1994. ISBN: 310062906X

Le Millénaire Rimbaud, Rancière, Jacques. Le Millénaire Rimbaud. Belin, 1993. ISBN: 2701115221

Los Nombres de la Historia: una Poetica del Saber, Rancière, Jacques. Los Nombres de la Historia: una Poetica del Saber. Nueva Vision, 1993. ISBN: 9506022879

La Politique des Poètes: Pourquoi des Poètes en Temps de Détresse?, Rancière, Jacques, and Alain Badiou. La Politique des Poètes: Pourquoi des Poètes en Temps de Détresse. A. Michel, 1992. ISBN: 2226057498

Les Noms de l’Histoire: Essai de Poétique du Savoir, Rancière, Jacques. Les Noms de l’Histoire: Essai de Poétique du Savoir. Editions du Seuil, 1992. ISBN: 2020200600

Breves Viajes al País del Pueblo, Rancière, Jacques. Breves Viajes al País del Pueblo. Nueva Vision, 1991. ISBN: 9506022437

The Ignorant Schoolmaster: Five Lessons in Intellectual Emancipation, Rancière, Jacques. The Ignorant Schoolmaster: Five Lessons in Intellectual Emancipation. Translated by Kristin Ress. Stanford University Press, 1991. ISBN: 0804718741

Courts Voyages au Pays du Peuple, Rancière, Jacques. Courts Voyages au Pays du Peuple. Editions du Seuil, 1990. ISBN: 2020115441

Aux bords du Politique, Rancière, Jacques. Aux bords du Politique. Editions Osiris, 1990. ISBN: 2905460202

The Nights of Labor, Rancière, Jacques. The Nights of Labor. Translated by John Drury. Temple University Press, 1989. ISBN: 0877226253

A Noite dos Proletários, Rancière, Jacques. A Noite dos Proletários. Companhia das Letras, 1988. ISBN: 8571640068

Le Maître Ignorant: Cinq Leçons sur l’Emancipation Intellectuelle, Rancière, Jacques. Le Maître Ignorant: Cinq Leçons sur l’Emancipation Intellectuelle. Fayard, 1987. ISBN: 2264040173

Esthétiques du Peuple, Rancière, Jacques. Esthétiques du Peuple. Editions La Découverte, 1985. ISBN: 2707115037

L’Empire du Sociologue, Rancière, Jacques. L’Empire du Sociologue. Editions la Découverte, 1984. ISBN: 2707114472

Le Philosophe et ses Pauvres, Rancière, Jacques. Le Philosophe et ses Pauvres. Flammarion, 1983. ISBN: 2213012652

La Nuit des Prolétaires, Rancière, Jacques. La Nuit des Prolétaires. Fayard, 1981. ISBN: 2213009856

La Formation de la Pensée Ouvrière en France: le Prolétaire et Son Double, Rancière, Jacques. “La Formation de la Pensée Ouvrière en France: le Prolétaire et Son Double.” PhD Diss., Sorbonne, 1980.

La Parole Ouvrière: 1830 – 1851, Rancière, Jacques. La Parole Ouvrière: 1830 – 1851. Union générale d’éditions, 1976. ISBN: 2264000538

Wider den Akademischen Marxismus, Rancière, Jacques. Wider den akademischen Marxismus. Translated by Otto Kallscheuer. Merve, 1975. ISBN: 3920986725

La Leçon d’Althusser, Rancière, Jacques. La Leçon d’Althusser. Gallimard, 1974. ISBN: 2070352943

El Concepto de Crítica y la Crítica de la Economía Política: de los “Manuscritos de 1844 a El capital”, Rancière, Jacques. El Concepto de Crítica y la Crítica de la Economía Política: de los “Manuscritos de 1844 a El capital”. Translated by Victor Goldstein. Noé, 1974.

Lire le Capital III, Rancière, Jacques. Lire le Capital III. Maspero, 1973.

Critica e Critica dell’Economia Politica: Dai “Manoscritti del 1844 al Capitale”,Rancière, Jacques . Critica e Critica dell’Economia Politica: Dai “Manoscritti del 1844 al Capitale”. Translated by Pier Aldo Rovatti. Feltrinelli, 1973.

Der Begriff der Kritik und die Kritik der Politischen Ökonomie: Von den “Pariser Manuskripten 1844 zum Kapital”, Rancière, Jacques. Der Begriff der Kritik und die Kritik der Politischen Ökonomie: Von den “Pariser Manuskripten 1844 zum Kapital.” Translated by Eva Pfaffenberger. Merve, 1972.

Le Concept de Critique et la Critique de l’eEconomie Politique des “Manuscrits de 1844 au Capital”, Rancière, Jacques. Le Concept de Critique et la Critique de l’eEconomie Politique des ‘Manuscrits de 1844 au Capital’. Maspero, 1967.

Articles

Sauvons le peuple grec de ses sauveurs!

Ranciere, Jacques, Alain Badiou, Jean-Christophe Bailly, Étienne Balibar, Claire Denis, Jean-Luc Nancy, Avital Ronell, “Sauvons le peuple grec de ses sauveurs!” Liberation. February 22, 2012.

Save the Greeks from their Saviors!

Ranciere, Jacques, Alain Badiou, Jean-Christophe Bailly, Étienne Balibar, Claire Denis, Jean-Luc Nancy, Avital Ronell. “Save the Greeks from their Saviors!” February 22, 2012. Translated by Drew S. Burk and Anastazia Golemi.

Retten wir das griechische Volk vor seinen Rettern!

Ranciere, Jacques, Alain Badiou, Jean-Christophe Bailly, Étienne Balibar, Claire Denis, Jean-Luc Nancy, Avital Ronell. “Retten wir das griechische Volk vor seinen Rettern!” February 21, 2012. Translated by Judith Dellheim.

Salvemos el pueblo griego de sus salvadores!

Ranciere, Jacques, Alain Badiou, Jean-Christophe Bailly, Étienne Balibar, Claire Denis, Jean-Luc Nancy, Avital Ronell. “Salvemos el pueblo griego de sus salvadores!” February 22, 2012. Translated by Mauricio Rugeles Schoonewolff.

Vamos salvar o povo grego dos seus salvadores!

Ranciere, Jacques, Alain Badiou, Jean-Christophe Bailly, Étienne Balibar, Claire Denis, Jean-Luc Nancy, Avital Ronell. “Vamos salvar o povo grego dos seus salvadores!” February 23, 2012. Translation by Alexandra Balona de Sá Oliveira and Sofia Borges.

Salviamo la Grecia dai suoi salvatori: Un appello agli intellettuali europe

Ranciere, Jacques, Alain Badiou, Jean-Christophe Bailly, Étienne Balibar, Claire Denis, Jean-Luc Nancy, Avital Ronell. “Salviamo la Grecia dai suoi salvatori: Un appello agli intellettuali europe,” laRepubblica.it, February 22, 2012. Translated by Vicky Skoumbi, Dimitris Vergetis, and Michel Surya.

Να Σώσουμε Τον Ελληνικό Λαό Aπό Tους Σωτήρες Του

Ranciere, Jacques, Alain Badiou, Jean-Christophe Bailly, Étienne Balibar, Claire Denis, Jean-Luc Nancy, Avital Ronell. “Να Σώσουμε Τον Ελληνικό Λαό Aπό Tους Σωτήρες Του.” in tometopo, February 21, 2012.

Rädda det grekiska folket från sina räddare!

Ranciere, Jacques, Alain Badiou, Jean-Christophe Bailly, Étienne Balibar, Claire Denis, Jean-Luc Nancy, Avital Ronell. “Rädda det grekiska folket från sina räddare!” February 24, 2012. Translation into Swedish by Erik Bryngelsson and Elin Fritiofsson.

Verlos de Grieken van hun verlossers!

Ranciere, Jacques, Alain Badiou, Jean-Christophe Bailly, Étienne Balibar, Claire Denis, Jean-Luc Nancy, Avital Ronell. “Verlos de Grieken van hun verlossers!” February 23, 2012. Translated by Dennis Schep.

Zbawmy Greków od ich zbawców!

Ranciere, Jacques, Alain Badiou, Jean-Christophe Bailly, Étienne Balibar, Claire Denis, Jean-Luc Nancy, Avital Ronell. “Zbawmy Greków od ich zbawców!” February 23, 2012. Translated by Krzyś Rowiński.

Spasimo Grčki Narod Od Njegovih Spasitelja!

Ranciere, Jacques, Alain Badiou, Jean-Christophe Bailly, Étienne Balibar, Claire Denis, Jean-Luc Nancy, Avital Ronell. “Spasimo Grčki Narod Od Njegovih Spasitelja!” February 22, 2012. Translated by Vesna Madzoski.

Rešite Grke pred njihovimi rešitelji!

Ranciere, Jacques, Alain Badiou, Jean-Christophe Bailly, Étienne Balibar, Claire Denis, Jean-Luc Nancy, Avital Ronell. “Rešite Grke pred njihovimi rešitelji!” February 24, 2012. Translated by Jožica Grgič.

Yunan Halkını Kurtarıcılarından Kurtaralım!

Ranciere, Jacques, Alain Badiou, Jean-Christophe Bailly, Étienne Balibar, Claire Denis, Jean-Luc Nancy, Avital Ronell. “Yunan Halkını Kurtarıcılarından Kurtaralım!” February 24, 2012. Translated by Ali Bolcakan, Nilüfer Akalın and Can Semercioğlu.

Shpëtojini grekët nga shpëtimtarët e tyre!

Ranciere, Jacques, Alain Badiou, Jean-Christophe Bailly, Étienne Balibar, Claire Denis, Jean-Luc Nancy, Avital Ronell. “Shpëtojini grekët nga shpëtimtarët e tyre!” February 24, 2012. Translated by Arlind Qori.

The Aesthetic Heterotopia

Rancière, Jacques, “The Aesthetic Heterotopia.” Philosophy Today 54 (2010): 15.

The aesthetic dimension : aesthetics, politics, knowledge

Rancière, Jacques. “The aesthetic dimension : aesthetics, politics, knowledge.” Critical Inquiry Vol. 36, No. 1 (2009): 1-19.

Notes on the Photographic Image

Rancière, Jacques, “Notes on the Photographic Image.” Radical Philsophy 158 (2009): 8.

A few remarks on the method of Jacques Rancière

Rancière, Jacques. “A few remarks on the method of Jacques Rancière.” Parallax Vol. 15, No. 3 (2009): 114-123.

Do Pictures Really Want to Live?

Rancière, Jacques, “Do Pictures Really Want to Live?” Culture, Theory and CritiqueVol. 50, No. 2-3 (2009):123-132.

Why Emma Bovary Had to Be Killed

Rancière, Jacques. “Why Emma Bovary Had to Be Killed.” Critical Inquiry Vol. 34, No. 3 (2008): 233.

Le Travail de l’image

Rancière, Jacques. “Le Travail de l’image.” Multitude June (2008).

Election et raison démocratique

Rancière, Jacques. “Election et raison démocratique.” Le Monde, March 22, 2007.

The Ethical Turn of Aesthetics and Politics

Rancière, Jacques. “The Ethical Turn of Aesthetics and Politics.” Critical Horizons Vol. 7, No. 1 (2006): 1-20.

Thinking between disciplines: an aesthetics of knowledge

Rancière, Jacques. “Thinking between disciplines: an aesthetics of knowledge.” Translated by Jon Roffe. Parrhesia 1 (2006).

La poétique du savoir

Rancière, Jacques. “La poétique du savoir.” Multitude (2005).

Introducing Disagreement

Rancière, Jacques. “Introducing Disagreement.” Angelaki Vol. 9, No. 3 (2004): 3-9.

Is there a Deleuzian Aesthetics?

Rancière, Jacques. “Is there a Deleuzian Aesthetics?” Translated by Radmila Djordjevic. Qui Parle Vol. 14, No. 2 (2004): 1–14.

Who Is the Subject of the Rights of Man?

Rancière, Jacques. “Who Is the Subject of the Rights of Man?” The South Atlantic Quarterly Vol. 103, No. 2/3, Spring/Summer (2004): 297–310.

Prisoners of the Infinite

Rancière, Jacques. “Prisoners of the Infinite.” CounterPunch, April 30, 2002.

Ten Thesis on Politics

Rancière, Jacques. “Ten Thesis on Politics.” Theory & Event Vol. 5, No. 3 (2001).

After What

Rancière, Jacques. “After What.” Topoi Vol. 7, No. 2 (2001): 181-185.

La pensée d’ailleurs

Rancière, Jacques. “La pensée d’ailleurs.” Critique (1978).

On the Theory of Ideology

Rancière, Jacques. “On the Theory of Ideology.” Radical Philosophy 7 (1974).

Interviews

PHILO: Recontre avec Jacque Rancière

Rancière, Jacque, and Hugues Simard, “PHILO: Recontre avec Jacque Rancière.” Le Journal Des Grandes Ecoles, November 13, 2012.

Interview with Jacques Rancière

Rancière, Jacques, and Lawrence Liang, “Interview with Jacques Rancière.” Lodi Gardens, Delhi, February 2009.

Le plaisir de la métamorphose politique

Rancière, Jacques, and Judith Revel. “Le plaisir de la métamorphose politique,” Libération, May 24, 2008.

Aesthetics against Incarnation: An Interview by Anne Marie Oliver

Rancière, Jacques, and Anne Marie Oliver. “Aesthetics against Incarnation: An Interview by Anne Marie Oliver.” Critical Inquiry Vol. 35, No. 1 (2008).

Art Is Going Elsewhere. And Politics Has to Catch It

Rancière, Jacques, and Sudeep Dasgupta. “Art Is Going Elsewhere. And Politics Has to Catch It.” Krisis 1 (2008).

Art of the possible: Fulvia Carnevale and John Kelsey in conversation with Jacques Ranciere

Rancière, Jacques, Fulvia Carnevale, and John Kelsey. “Art of the possible: Fulvia Carnevale and John Kelsey in conversation with Jacques Ranciere.” Artforum, March 2007.

Le partage du sensible: Interview

Rancière, Jacques. “Le partage du sensible: Interview.” Multitude (2007).

Our police order: What can be said, seen, and done

Rancière, Jacques, and Truls Lie. “Our police order: What can be said, seen, and done.” Le Monde diplomatique, August 11, 2006.

Politics & Aesthetics

Rancière, Jacques, and Peter Hallward. “Politics & Aesthetics.” Angelaki Vol. 8, No. 2 (2003).

Entretien avec Jacques Rancière

Rancière, Jacques. “Entretien avec Jacques Rancière.” Filozofski vestnik Vol. 15, No. 2 (2007).

Democracy means equality: Interview

Rancière, Jacques. “Democracy means equality: Interview.” Radical Philosophy 82 (1997).

Lectures

Jacques Rancière

An Archaeology of the Temporality of Modernism and Avant-Gardism

04.02.2014
Jacques Rancière

Literary Communities

16.09.2013
Jacques Rancière

Negation and Cinematic Vertigo 11/11

25.09.2009
Jacques Rancière

Negation and Cinematic Vertigo 10/11

25.09.2009
Jacques Rancière

Negation and Cinematic Vertigo 9/11

25.09.2009
Jacques Rancière

Negation and Cinematic Vertigo 8/11

25.09.2009
Jacques Rancière

Negation and Cinematic Vertigo 7/11

25.09.2009
Jacques Rancière

Negation and Cinematic Vertigo 6/11

25.09.2009
Jacques Rancière

Negation and Cinematic Vertigo 5/11

25.09.2009
Jacques Rancière

Negation and Cinematic Vertigo 4/11

25.09.2009
Jacques Rancière

Negation and Cinematic Vertigo 3/11

25.09.2009
Jacques Rancière

Negation and Cinematic Vertigo 2/11

25.09.2009
Jacques Rancière

Negation and Cinematic Vertigo 1/11

25.09.2009